Bartimaeus – A faith that “speaks up and acts”

As I was doing a bit of reading about today’s gospel, I came across this reflection by Marcellino D’Ambrosio that I found helpful as he relates the story to our experience of the Eucharist.  Here are two excerpts (I recommend you click through to read the rest:)

Fortunately, Bartimaeus had the kind of faith that speaks up and acts up. Jesus says elsewhere in the Gospel that he who asks, receives.  He tells parables about seemingly rude widows and neighbors who make a nuisance of themselves, persistently asking for what they want and finally getting it….

Well, every Sunday I’m confronted with the real and true presence of the same One who healed Bartimaeus.  For in the Eucharist the sacrament of sacraments, it is not just God’s grace (which is awesome enough) but Christ’s bodily presence which is made available.  Guaranteed.

So why do so many of us go to Mass again and again and walk out the door much the same as we went in?  Why so little healing, so little growth in holiness?   Maybe because we lack the outrageous faith of Bartimaeus.  Every sacramental celebration, especially the Eucharist, says the Catechism (CCC 739, 1106), is a new Pentecost.  The gifts of the Holy Spirit, forgiveness, healing, purification, guidance, all are there for the taking.  We don’t need to shout like Bartimaeus.  But like him, we can determine to stop going home empty handed.

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About Jeremy

I work at Holy Ghost Catholic Church in Hammond, LA. I teach part-time classes from time to time, through Loyola University in New Orleans, Notre Dame Seminary in New Orleans and St. Joseph's Abbey and Seminary College. I also just finished a doctoral degree in Biblical languages through the University of Stellenbosch in South Africa.
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One Response to Bartimaeus – A faith that “speaks up and acts”

  1. Ann T. Mejia says:

    Praise Jesus for such a courageous man!

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